Novedad bibliográficaInfoling 5.15 (2017)

Autor/a: Costello, Brendan
Título: Language and modality
Subtítulo: Effects of the use of space in the agreement system of lengua de signos española (Spanish Sign Language)
Año de publicación: 2016
Lugar de edición: Utrecht (The Netherlands)
Editorial: Landelijke Onderzoekschool Taalwetenschap (LOT) / The Netherlands National Graduate School of Linguistics
Descripción

This thesis examines agreement in Spanish Sign Language (lengua de signos española – LSE) and provides a comprehensive description of the agreement mechanisms available to the language based on data collected from LSE signers from the Basque Country. This description makes it possible to compare agreement in LSE with what has been described for other sign languages, and also to offer a cross-modal comparison of the phenomenon, that is, to compare agreement in a signed language to agreement in spoken languages. Underlying this comparison is the issue of whether what we call agreement in sign languages is the same thing as what is called agreement in spoken languages.

The study provides a strong case that this spatial mechanism in LSE (i) is a type of agreement that is similar to what has been described for other sign languages, (ii) is comparable to agreement processes in spoken languages, and (iii) can be accounted for in syntactic terms. The thesis includes discussion of what the findings tell us about LSE, sign languages, and natural languages in general.

Temática: Lengua de señas

Índice

ABBREVIATIONS OF SIGN LANGUAGE NAMES
NOTATION CONVENTIONS

1. INTRODUCTION
1.1. LANGUAGE AND MODALITY
1.1.1. Simultaneity in sign languages
1.1.2. Iconicity in sign languages
1.2. THE USE OF SPACE IN SIGN LANGUAGES
1.3. THE STUDY OF VERBAL AGREEMENT IN SIGN LANGUAGES
1.4. LENGUA DE SIGNOS ESPAÑOLA (LSE)
1.4.1. LSE: historical background
1.4.2. LSE: sociolinguistic setting
1.4.3. Previous research on LSE
1.4.4. The LSE in this study
1.5. THE GOALS OF THIS THESIS
1.6. THE STRUCTURE OF THIS THESIS

2. THEORIES OF AGREEMENT
2.1. TWO APPROACHES TO AGREEMENT
2.2. TYPOLOGICAL APPROACH
2.2.1. Terminology
2.2.2. Controllers
2.2.3. Targets
2.2.4. Domains
2.2.5. Features and values
2.2.6. Conditions
2.2.7. Canonicity
2.2.8. Summary
2.3. THE MINIMALIST PROGRAM
2.3.1. Generativism: issues and developments
2.3.2. The architecture of the language faculty
2.3.3. Agreement and Agree
2.4. SUMMARY

3. AGREEMENT IN SIGN LANGUAGES
3.1. PRONOMINAL REFERENCE
3.1.1. Location assignment
3.1.2. Role shift
3.1.3. R-locus and space
3.2. AGREEING VERBS
3.2.1. Prototypical agreeing verbs
3.2.2. Backwards agreeing verbs
3.2.3. Single argument agreement
3.2.4. Summary
3.3. AGREEMENT AUXILIARIES
3.3.1. AUX
3.3.2. Auxiliaries derived from lexical verbs
3.3.3. PAM
3.3.4. Issue arising: what agreement auxiliaries tell us about agreement
3.4. NON-MANUAL AGREEMENT
3.4.1. Head tilt and eye gaze as markers of subject and object agreement
3.4.2. Non-manual agreement in role shift
3.4.3. Summary
3.5. DP-INTERNAL AGREEMENT
3.6. SUMMARY

4. METHODOLOGY
4.1. METHODOLOGICAL CHALLENGES: THE ELUSIVE NATIVE SIGNER
4.2. INFORMANTS
4.3. DATA COLLECTION AND MATERIALS
4.4. TRANSCRIPTION
4.5. DATA ANALYSIS
4.6. SUMMARY

5. AGREEMENT PHENOMENA IN LSE
5.1. PRONOMINAL REFERENCE
5.1.1. Location assignment in LSE
5.1.2. Role shift in LSE
5.2. AGREEING VERBS
5.2.1. Prototypical agreeing verbs
5.2.2. Backward agreeing verbs
5.2.3. Single argument agreement
5.3. AGREEMENT AUXILIARIES
5.3.1. AUX
5.3.2. Auxiliaries derived from lexical verbs: GIVE-AUX and BEAT-AUX
5.3.3. PERS
5.3.4. Summary
5.4. CONSTRAINTS ON VERBAL AGREEMENT
5.4.1. Semantic constraints on agreeing verbs
5.4.2. Phonological constraints on agreeing verbs
5.5. NON-MANUAL AGREEMENT
5.6. DP-INTERNAL AGREEMENT
5.7. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS

6. LSE AGREEMENT FROM A CROSS-MODAL TYPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE
6.1. CONTROLLERS
6.2. TARGETS
6.2.1. Verbs and auxiliaries
6.2.2. Other targets of agreement
6.2.3. Means of exponence
6.2.4. Multiple exponence
6.2.5. Summary
6.3. DOMAINS
6.3.1. Clause-internal agreement
6.3.2. Agreement beyond the clause
6.4. FEATURES AND VALUES
6.4.1. Gender
6.4.2. Number
6.4.3. Person
6.4.4. Other features: respect and case
6.4.5. Summary
6.5. CONDITIONS
6.6. CANONICITY
6.6.1. Applying Corbett’s criteria to spatial agreement in LSE
6.6.2. Applying Corbett’s general principles to spatial agreement in LSE
6.6.3. Other evaluations of the canonicity of sign language agreement
6.6.4. Summary
6.7. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS

7. FORMAL ANALYSES OF AGREEMENT IN LSE
7.1. LOCATION, IDENTITY AND LOCATING IDENTITY
7.1.1. The location of ϕ-features
7.1.2. The location of the identity feature
7.1.3. Optionality of the use of space
7.2. ACCOUNTING FOR SPATIAL AGREEMENT IN LSE
7.2.1. Location assignment
7.2.2. Verbal agreement
7.2.3. Pragmatic agreement
7.2.4. Summary
7.3. “DEFECTIVE” AGREEING VERBS IN LSE: AN OT ACCOUNT
7.3.1. “Defective” agreeing verbs in LSE
7.3.2. OT constraints
7.3.3. Applying the constraints
7.3.4. Extending the analysis to ISL data
7.4. ISSUES ARISING
7.4.1. Optionality (revisited)
7.4.2. Locative versus locus
7.4.3. Linearity
7.5. CONCLUSIONS

8. CLOSING REMARKS
8.1. WHAT THIS STUDY TELLS US…
8.1.1. …about LSE
8.1.2. …about sign languages in general
8.1.3. …about language
8.2. WHAT THIS STUDY DOES NOT TELL US
8.3. FUTURE DIRECTIONS

REFERENCES


Págs.: 415
ISBN-13: 9789460931970
Precio: 39,00 EUR

Remitente: Infoling  <infolingantispaminfoling.org>
Fecha: 6 de mayo de 2017

Información publicada en Infoling: http://www.infoling.org/informacion/NB1644.html



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