Novedad bibliográficaInfoling 8.37 (2017)

Autor/a: Song, Sanghoun
Título: Modeling information structure in a cross-linguistic perspective
Año de publicación: 2017
Lugar de edición: Berlin
Editorial: Language Science Press
Descripción

This study makes substantial contributions to both the theoretical and computational treatment of information structure, with a specific focus on creating natural language processing applications such as multilingual machine translation systems. The present study first provides cross-linguistic findings in regards to information structure meanings and markings. Building upon such findings, the current model represents information structure within the HPSG/MRS framework using Individual Constraints. The primary goal of the present study is to create a multilingual grammar model of information structure for the LinGO Grammar Matrix system. The present study explores the construction of a grammar library for creating customized grammar incorporating information structure and illustrates how the information structure-based model improves performance of transfer-based machine translation.


About the author

Sanghoun Song (1977) is specialized in grammar engineering based on the HPSG and MRS formalism. He graduated from Korea University in Seoul, where he earned his BA and MA degree in linguistics. He received a PhD in linguistics from University of Washington in Seattle. Afterwards, he worked at the computational linguistics lab. at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore as a research fellow. Now, he is an assistant professor at Incheon National University. His research interests include grammatical theory (the theory of computational grammar from a cross-linguistic perspective), experimental syntax (the use of acceptability judgments as evidence for linguistic theories), and corpus linguistics (the use of data-based methods to capture linguistic phenomena in human languages).

Temática: Análisis del discurso, Lingüística computacional, Lingüística de corpus, Pragmática, Semántica, Sintaxis

Índice

Acknowledgments
Abbreviations

1 Introduction
1.1 Motivations
1.2 Grammar engineering
1.3 Outline

2 Preliminary notes
2.1 Examples
2.2 Terminology

3 Meanings of information structure
3.1 Information status
3.2 Focus
3.2.1 Definition
3.2.2 Subtypes of focus
3.2.3 Linguistic properties of focus
3.2.4 Tests for Focus
3.3 Topic
3.3.1 Definition
3.3.2 Subtypes of topic
3.3.3 Linguistic properties of topic
3.3.4 Tests for topic
3.4 Contrast
3.4.1 Definition
3.4.2 Subtypes of contrast
3.4.3 Linguistic properties of contrast
3.4.4 Tests for contrast
3.5 Background
3.6 Summary
Contents

4 Markings of information structure
4.1 Prosody
4.1.1 Prosody as a widespread means of marking
4.1.2 Mappings between prosody and information structure
4.1.3 Flexible representation
4.2 Lexical markers
4.2.1 Multiple markers
4.2.2 Positioning constraints
4.2.3 Categorical restriction
4.2.4 Interaction with syntax
4.3 Syntactic positioning
4.3.1 Focus position
4.3.2 Topic position
4.3.3 Contrast position
4.4 Summary

5 Discrepancies between meaning and marking
5.1 Ambivalent lexical markers
5.2 Focus/Topic fronting
5.3 Competition between prosody and syntax
5.4 Multiple positions of focus
5.5 Summary

6 Literature review
6.1 Information structure in HPSG
6.1.1 Sentential forms
6.1.2 Location within the feature geometry
6.1.3 Underspecification
6.1.4 Marking vs. meaning
6.2 Information structure in MRS
6.3 Phonological information in HPSG
6.4 Information structure in other frameworks
6.4.1 CCG-based studies
6.4.2 LFG-based studies
6.5 Summary

7 Individual CONStraints: fundamentals
7.1 Minimal Recursion Semantics
7.2 Motivations
7.2.1 Morphosyntactic markings vs. Semantic representation
7.2.2 Underspecification
7.2.3 Binary relations
7.2.4 Informative emptiness
7.2.5 Summary
7.3 Information structure (info-str)
7.3.1 ICONS
7.3.2 ICONS-KEY and CLAUSE-KEY
7.3.3 Summary
7.4 Markings (mkg)
7.5 Sentential forms (sform)
7.6 Graphical representation
7.7 Summary

8 Individual CONStraints: specifics of the implementation
8.1 Lexical types
8.1.1 Nominal items
8.1.2 Verbal items
8.1.3 Adpositions
8.1.4 Determiners
8.1.5 Adverbs
8.1.6 Conjunctions
8.2 Phrasal types
8.3 Additional constraints on configuring information structure
8.3.1 Periphery
8.3.2 Lightness .
8.3.3 Phonological structure
8.4 Sample derivations
8.4.1 English
8.4.2 Japanese and Korean
8.4.3 Russian
8.5 Summary

9 Multiclausal constructions
9.1 Complement clauses
9.1.1 Background
9.1.2 Analysis
9.2 Relative clauses
9.2.1 Background
9.2.2 Analysis
9.3 Adverbial clauses
9.3.1 Background
9.3.2 Analysis
9.4 Summary

10 Forms of expressing information structure
10.1 Focus sensitive items
10.1.1 Quantifiers
10.1.2 Wh-words
10.1.3 Negative expressions
10.2 Argument optionality
10.3 Scrambling
10.4 Cleft constructions
10.4.1 Properties
10.4.2 Subtypes
10.4.3 Components
10.4.4 It-clefts in the ERG
10.5 Passive constructions
10.6 Fronting
10.7 Dislocation
10.8 Summary

11 Focus projection
11.1 Parse trees
11.2 F(ocus)-marking
11.2.1 Usage of MRS
11.2.2 Languages without focus prosody
11.2.3 Lexical markers
11.3 Grammatical relations
11.4 An analysis
11.4.1 Basic data
11.4.2 Rules
11.4.3 Representation
11.4.4 Further question
11.5 Summary

12 Customizing information structure
12.1 Type description language
12.2 The questionnaire
12.2.1 Focus
12.2.2 Topic
12.2.3 Contrastive focus
12.2.4 Contrastive topic
12.3 The Matrix core
12.3.1 Fundamentals
12.3.2 Lexical types
12.3.3 Lexical rules
12.3.4 Phrase structure rules
12.4 Customized grammar creation
12.4.1 Lexical markers
12.4.2 Syntactic positioning
12.5 Regression testing
12.5.1 Testsuites
12.5.2 Pseudo grammars
12.5.3 Processing
12.6 Testing with Language CoLLAGE
12.6.1 Languages
12.6.2 Testsuites
12.6.3 Comparison
12.6.4 Information structure in the four languages
12.6.5 Summary
12.7 Live-site
12.8 Download

13 Multilingual machine translation
13.1 Transfer-based machine translation
13.2 Basic machinery
13.3 Processor
13.4 Evaluation
13.4.1 Illustrative grammars
13.4.2 Testsuites
13.4.3 An experiment
13.5 Summary

14 Conclusion
14.1 Summary
14.2 Contributions
14.3 Future Work

List of references
Bibliography
Index
Name index
Language index
Subject index


Colección: Topics at the Grammar-Discourse Interface, 1
Formato: PDF
Págs.: 310
ISBN-13: 9783946234906

Remitente: Infoling  <infolingantispaminfoling.org>
Fecha: 31 de agosto de 2017

Información publicada en Infoling: http://www.infoling.org/informacion/NB1691.html



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